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07 Dec 2008 - 19:538329
Age, lack of social boundaries, or a gap in generations - discuss.
As the anime fandom becomes better established over here, so the longterm fans grow older and also new generations of fans join.
Not only do we have the pre-book conventions, but also Expos, where people can turn up on the day and any number of fans can attend.

But at these Expo events it is noticeable that there is something of a lack of social boundaries - unwanted glomping, people being unnecessarily loud (shouting yaoi etc.) and some outright exhibitionist acts.

Is this a reflection on the youth of today (lesser respect for those around them), the backlash of fans breaking away from the 'geek' name (overcompensation of extroversion to 'prove' that they are not antisocial) or is it just a new way for teens to display their sense of self?


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07 Dec 2008 - 20:308332
I know havent been in the scene for to long but have to say going to 2 expos and seeing how some minors (under the age of 16) and few above that age behave.

Overly sexual gestures verbally and physically make me personal gestures feel uncomfortable. I've seen cosplayers shout obscenities, reinacting scenes of a sexual nature.

and in all honesty would people do this in normal day to day life? like at school, college or the town centre on a saturday? I would think not. But can someone explain why it is exceptable at an anime convention?

it really baffles me! when i as under 16 all i could care about was listening to Blink 182, watching sailor moon and being a tomboy.

edit: after just discussing to friends, the teens that are openly sexual infront of crowds at expo do not appreciate that young children and parents attend to. what examples do they set? it's not a good example and can imagine if i saw this a few years ago I think I would be scared. There are some things you can share with just your friends at home.



Last edited by angel aiko (07 Dec 2008 - 20:35)
07 Dec 2008 - 22:208337
i was 14 when i first started conventions and tbf wether it was because of the crowd i joined or wether its not, i can be annoying and tell jokes but its of a mature nature and not in a silly sense of humour or annoying ness i mean when i first attended expos somehow i managed to get myself in the adult crowd(mangachild,hellokityy) them lot and i know theyvee helped me mature alot so that might be the reason im not running round screaming OHH YURII YEY , only thing i do diferently at conventions than i do in normal life is cosplay and thats about it


08 Dec 2008 - 00:318339
I just think that people that age will find a way to express themselves no matter what their fandom is.

It just happens that in cosplay they have excuses to act out "in character" etc. and can be as hyper as they want and when called on it just say "Well, that's how Naruto/Sora etc. are!"

To be honest, I much prefer the events that are 16+. Expos are full of people running around, acting like idiots, glomping, free-hugs, yaoi-obsessed tweens and also over-sexed kids who see cosplay as a way to act out their fantasies.


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08 Dec 2008 - 10:548346
I've long had a theory about this.

I've been cosplaying since 2002, back then I was only 15 myself and I did a lot of stupid things. I am sure we all have as kids/teenagers.

The thing with Expo's and the young "cosplay and otaku" scene (for lack of a better grouping) is not only the change in todays social climate, but also the "freedom" that places like Expo offer.

Let me explain further:

Today's youth generation certainly has a lot less respect for traditional values. Youth crime is on the rise, discipline has gone out of the window (both in the home and at school) and the media shows certain things (violence, sexual behaviour) to younger and younger audiences.

You get two types at Expo's I believe.

Your average, yaoi-shouting, paddle wielding, glomping Expo-goer is likely to be a social outcast in their primary environment (high school). The Expo is a place where this individual feels "welcome", something that I imagine they wouldn't get at your average highschool if homosexual, Japanese animation is one of your primary interests.

This person probably stands up and proudly states how "different" they are, wearing their individuality like a suit of armour. Anybody who questions them is only trying to repress their individuality and is probably "ignorant".

Anyway, this type feels welcome at Expo and they probably think (with good reason if you look at most forums these days) that everybody else is the same. Because of this sense of "belonging", then individual drops social boundaries, after all all the people at Expo like the same things as them right? If somebody is in a costume they must be an individual like them, somebody who "gets them".

These people, I understand. It may annoy the crud out of me if somebody yells "YAOI" in my ear as they excitedly talk with their new friends... but I was pretty annoying when I was young (some might say I still am )as well.

I don't mind this group, I politely say "No thank you" to their free hug sign and will pose for a photo. If I see them coming for a "glomp" I will just raise my hand and make it clear it isn't going to happen.

Annoying. Yes. But, I think it's a safe bet that given four to five years they will think back to now, facepalm, and probably make the same complaints that we are right now.

But, there is the *other* kind of Expo goer.

The leech.

This person is like the above, but there is a big difference. They keep to themselves at school, they are probably the quiet one who doesn't really talk to anybody. The kind whose parents worry about them because they spend all day and night on the computer, never going out to see people.

When they finally get to an Expo, or a forum, they see all these girls and guy (the person above) getting attention and being welcomed and having physical contact that type 2 has only ever dreamed about.

So they join in.

They are the ones who awkwardly hold "free hugs" signs and follow cosplayers around but never actually go and speak to them. If they see somebody getting a hug, BAM, they are right there like it's some sort of queue for physical contact.

They throw together a cheap hash of a costume of a character they *know* gets a lot of attention, just to get that fangirl/fanboy affection.

In four or five years time, they will probably be that creepy stalker you hear about. Or, will get a massive DSLR and take pervy photos.

-------

Write, if you bothered to read all that. WELL DONE!
+1,000,000 exp for you!

tl dr;

Two types of them expo kids imo. One is annoying, but is genuinely just an excitable teenager. Annoying but they will grow out of it. The other is a freaky, awkward, stalker-type who will grow up to stalk you and bitch about you on "theChan" if you don't speak to them ALL THE TIME.



~ M


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08 Dec 2008 - 11:088348
Quote PrincessMark:

In four or five years time, they will probably be that creepy stalker you hear about. Or, will get a massive DSLR and take pervy photos.


OH SNAP! XD

There's not much more I can say that Mark hasn't. Many of us have been through a stage of being a bit nuts at conventions, it's part of being young and starting out in a community that is so accepting. It's something many people grow out of eventually.



Last edited by Kazz (08 Dec 2008 - 11:42)
08 Dec 2008 - 11:198349
The differences between Anime Fans (LONG POST)
Jebus funny a friend and me were having this same discussion last night.

This is going to be a long post but should provide some incite full information if you read it all.

The way I see is simplistic and unique. There are a few core group of Anime fans or Otaku they differ by country and even by states/counties sometimes. The world over there are several distinct groups of Anime Fans and cosplayers. I will start with the youngest and work my way up.


--1. The young ones primarily ages 12-20. This group also includes kids in high school and grade school.

This group tends to be the cartoon network generation. They were introduced to Anime by watching Naruto and One Piece on Network TV. They tend to be at the low end of the money scale.

There disposable income fuels the industry since they can focus most of their money into Anime and Manga.

They are hyperactive and tend to run around a lot at events. Some are real good cosplayers while the majority of them are dressed as Nauruto, Bleach and Kingdome Hearts. Many times, they only go to one or two anime events a year.

In the UK, they tend to frequent the London Expo or Comic Con depending on the time of year. This age group is also known, just to show up to the London Expo, to sit and socialize outside of the Excel Center and not buy a ticket.

IN the USA, there known to come to Conventions and sleep in the halls of the hotel since they are not of age to get a hotel room. In addition, they are notorious for being drunk underage.

To this demographic Anime events and fandom are more about socializing then buying and doing the activitys of the Anime Event or Conventions. However, things sometimes get out of hand. Their known to be vocaly loud and sit on the floor at events. Some run around wild and are hyper or act strange. This is normal since there is no authority figure around. Many times, they eat Pocky and other Japanese snacks.

In Japan, you never see Anime otaku this young at anime event due to the social nature of the country. They view Otaku as a thing you do when you are older since Anime is part of the cultural landscape.


--2. The Midge Anime Otaku.

This age demographic is between 20-25 they are made up of young working people, collage and uni students.

This group tends to be the brake out-group of the three. They are beginning to define what kind of Anime Otaku they are. By this time, most have found Series, manga or video games they love aside from the mainstream and are open to buying new series and manga.

They have somewhat more buying power depending the previous demographic. Disposable income is still a big draw for Anime companies to market their products to this demographic.

There cosplay tend to become more complex and have more detail. Many times this group will only cosplay at events and conventions. Cosplaying starts to become competitive for this demographic.

In Japan, this group is the mainstream fans at Anime Conventions. They swarm in large numbers to events like Comiket and Tokyo Anime Festival. They will to stand in line for hours and days to get into events. Some events entrance lines span several miles from the convention center.

They are also known for the Otaku Run. This is the mad charge to the dealer’s room at Comiket as soon as they open the door. Most of the time they are after limited edition manga and anime stuffs. Many times, you will see Japanese Otaku sitting on the floor with plies of manga and dojinshi next to them. Its not out of the norm to see a Japanese person asleep surrounded by a huge pile of manga at comiket.

In the USA and Europe, this group makes up an estimated 40-52% of the demographic for Anime conventions. They tend to be of age to drink and occupy most convention events. Many anime conventions staff is in this age group. This group is the core mover of the Anime industry.



--3. The Mature Otaku Age 26-55

This group is made up of people that have finished school or have a family. Many times, they are single working professionals making decent money. This group has a lot of buying power then the last two. This group is very set in their ways pertaining to Anime, Manga and cosplay they are open to new series but still love the classics they grew up with.

It should be noted they tend to stay away from the first age group. Mainly because they are older and a bit more mature.

Some in this age group see the younger groups as bring down the image of Otaku and cosplayers to the normal world. However, in the view of this writer I do not see that as a true statement.

Since Anime Otaku in this group, by far have the most buying power of all the groups since they can dedicate quite a bit of money to buying Anime, manga and associated items. I have known Otaku in this group that have over 500 DVD’s of anime and houses filled with cosplays and anime stuff.

They are known for the most detailed cosplays of the three groups. Some spend weeks and hours perfecting there cosplay to the point of obsession. Many of the best cosplay photographers are in the age group as well. Many Japanese cosplayer turn there passion into photagrpahy. It is not out of the norm to hear of a Japanese cosplayer turned photographer. Many have high end SLR's and mid range video cameras leading to tough rules for photographers at Japanese Anime and cosplaying, events.

In Japan, this group is very similar to the previous group with very little change. However, some will stray away from being an obsessive Otaku and start a family. Many will shun their previous Otaku lifestyle and move on in life. However, there are still elements of core otaku will not go away.

Some Japanese even live there Otaku life from the inside of their house never going outside for weeks or months. However, in recent years this has become increasingly rare due to the social reform programs of the Japanese government.

There is not much difference between the USA and Europe in this age group.


--To wrap it up

The anime culture as a whole is very new to the UK. It is really hitting its stride here and its growing rapidly each year. However, normal people have a hard time wrapping there mind around the fandom associated with anime.

Many see Anime as animated porn; we all know that is the farthest thing from the truth.

While comparing these groups I am not saying one is better than the other is.
Nevertheless, to get along with them we must understand them. I have no problem with 99% of the people that like Anime Manga etc. In my book if you like Anime Manga, etc etc etc you a friend and good person.

Anime Fans share a close-knit bond that is unusual compared to other fandoms. Many normal people do not understand this strange bond.

That is why I am doing everything I can to break down this barrier and help people understand that cosplayers and Otaku are not crazy and should not be shunned.

After all Otaku and anime fans are people too.

*Please Note:

Being American gives me a unique perspective on the whole thing since I have been to many Anime and Manga conventions around the world. Some this stuff even segways into my ongoing anime fandom documentary called Otaku Punch. I have interviewed over 50 people of all lifestyles and seen what it is really like in the Japanese world of the Otaku.

All this information comes from my extensive traveling of Japan the USA and Europe. I have been to more anime conventions then I can remember. Many events I have staffed or been a part of in some way. I lived in Japan for three years and spent a lot of time in Akihabra in Tokyo. I am an avid cosplayers and photographer/videographer.


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Last edited by nadesico81 (08 Dec 2008 - 13:28)
08 Dec 2008 - 11:348351
Quote angel aiko:
it really baffles me! when i as under 16 all i could care about was listening to Blink 182, watching sailor moon and being a tomboy.


Heh, a women after my own heart. Tomboy-ness aside, thats sounds like my teens.

I think we do have some level of a generation gap. All the young folks (Go I sound old) that go round with free hug signs, shouting at the top of their lungs and running round like they're on a convention-long suger-rush.

You compare that to the older teen/early twenties folks (which includes myself) we are more subdued, yet in some ways more open.
We wont be running around and shouting like mad, but some people may start wearing more explicit stuff and/or posing/acting a little more saucily.

Honestly, I think we'll always have some level of differance, and will always see younger fans doing stuff we may have done once. But its a learning curve we have to deal with.

I cant belive I'd say this, but they could do with looking at the memorabillia show. We had a fair number of people in cosplay, and loads of space outside the convention, but there was hardly any tomfoolery, apart from the kids playing with the stormtroopers/daleks...


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08 Dec 2008 - 12:058352
"I have no problem with 99% of the people that like Anime Manga etc. In my book if you like Anime Manga, etc etc etc you a friend and good person."

I think this is an over exaggeration, or a really big acceptance. And also brings up an... issue? I have with the cosplay community.
I find that some people make friends with others just because they are a cosplayer.
Now I have this possibly idealistic view of how my friendships should work, basically people should actually display 'friendship'.
I think I sometimes come across irl as being quite quiet and often people I have met before will not remember me because I don't go out of my way to be known and don't request the email, DA account, internet handle etc. of everyone who shows an interest in manga.
This is mostly because I would rather not be someone's 'friend' for 5 minutes and then realise we have completely different world views, other hobbies or we are completely different people with one common interest and we end up only talking once in a blue moon.

Also, being a fan of manga/anime/cosplay, does not mean you are not a criminal (murderer and worse etc.), cruel to animals/children/people, stuck up, self obsessed or generally just a disagreeable person.

I have friends who befriend people based on the fact they cosplay, and then get the brunt of the bitching when they feel that they have to invite a person they obviously don't like to social gatherings.

---

Also this use of the word Otaku. Slightly off topic, but linked to the whole murderer thing.
I get annoyed on occasion with kids wearing signs saying 'Otaku and proud'
I probably have a differing opinion to what an otaku is to these and other people. But it seems to be some kind of badge worn by people.
I like to think of Otaku more like the guy from 'Densha Otoko' a little sad, a big geek and rather helpless.
I don't think this is a bad thing because, and to sum up my points:
I preffered when anime fans were stereotyped as geeky, anti-social and possibly slightly smelly, rather than hyperactive, socially unaware and sometimes abusive


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08 Dec 2008 - 12:278353
Quote PrincessMark:
did a lot of stupid things. I am sure we all have as kids/teenagers.

The thing with Expo's and the young "cosplay and otaku" scene (for lack of a better grouping) is not only the change in todays social climate, but also the "freedom" that places like Expo offer.
Haha, I was such a twat as a kid. My first hotel convention was one day at Aya 2003, and my friends and I were cosplaying Saiyuki. We had prop mugshot signs as they do in the artbook such as "swindler", "murderer" and so on and thought we were so funny to make "will angst for money" - now I'm embarrassed, and can freely admit to that!

However I've been brought up to be very quiet, respectful (to those that deserve it) and pay attention to my language (as in I don't speak cockney lmao), so maybe it's why I find attitudes that were so not prevalent before so repulsive! I do not think so much this is a problem of age gap so much as maturity. But I have noticed a difference in behaviour between people that began cosplay a long time ago to people that began in, say, the last year.

Perhaps another contributing factor to this is suddenly it's cool to be "emo" as in "everyone is an individual just like me". It's cool to like "japanese things" like hello kitty and pokemon; to dye your hair bright colours and wear eyeliner - and that's just the guys! So thus through this "this scene" is getting more exposure, perhaps?

Quote nadesico81:
This is going to be a long post but should provide some incite full information if you read it all.
Did you mean that phrase? :s Also your "long post" could be cut down a lot if you took out all the irrelevant and unnecessary information, such as the first six paragraphs.

I'm not sure what you mean by "you never see Anime otaku this young at anime event due to the social nature of the country." either because most of my Japanese friends under 20 do attend cosplay events. Groups/clubs are set up in schools (animation club etc) for this, as far as I am aware. I am just going on what I have been told by my friends (as well as my own experience) so I can have been mislead, so I will apologise in advance if I am wrong!

Quote firedaemon:
Also this use of the word Otaku. Slightly off topic, but linked to the whole murderer thing. I get annoyed on occasion with kids wearing signs saying 'Otaku and proud'
LOL I don't get the love of the word otaku either. When I was first into anime and that lot back in 2003 I thought throwing in Japanese words was so COOL and maybe loads of people would do it, and now it's like... just say "geek". Less cool now huh? "I'm a morning musume GEEK".


08 Dec 2008 - 12:358354
@miiol Yeah, the whole throwing in Japanese words to look cool thing is something that goes away with age and is tolerable. It doesn't really get in anyone's way.

But like you said about being brought up to be quiet, respectful and watch your language, thing I think is the same for me.
This does not mean I have never been obnoxious, but I think the difference is knowing where the boundaries are with being an idiot (that you will look back and cringe over in a few years time) with your friends and just going up to a complete stranger and being hyperactive because you are so wacky and zany isn't funny why don't you want to hug me?


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08 Dec 2008 - 13:088356
Quote miiol:



I'm not sure what you mean by "you never see Anime otaku this young at anime event due to the social nature of the country." either because most of my Japanese friends under 20 do attend cosplay events. Groups/clubs are set up in schools (animation club etc) for this, as far as I am aware. I am just going on what I have been told by my friends (as well as my own experience) so I can have been mislead, so I will apologise in advance if I am wrong!



No problem it is ok. perhaps if I expained my self better. I have been studying this subject for quite some time. I also took the liberty of moveing the first parts of my first post to the end for refrence use.

In Japanese schools, yes there are anime clubs and stuff. But You hardly see people younger than about 18 at large Anime Conventions. There are allot of un spoken social rules in Japan for social groups and clubs. Most young Otaku are found in local Manga Cafes and Anime Shops. Most do not get out to conventions until they are older. In the USA and Europe it is different there is a wider appeal or Anime and manga at conventions. Also there are more anime conventons put on out side of Japan. Thats one of the reasons why most Japanese conventions are rather huge.

There is not a weekend that goes by in North America that does not have a Anime Convention going on some where.

Quote firedaemon:
Also this use of the word Otaku. Slightly off topic, but linked to the whole murderer thing. I get annoyed on occasion with kids wearing signs saying 'Otaku and proud'

Anime Conventions in the states and Japan have long banned the use of people carrying and holding Signs. Attendees are not allowed to hold signs or slogans due to the subjective nature and suggestions that people put on signs. It is my hope that events in the UK will ban signs in the future. Some signs are downright rude if you ask me.

To wrap it up

What I am trying to convey in that post is the subtitle differences between the three main age groups of Anime Fans. If you can understand them from a fans point of view you will understand why they act the way they do. Most fans change over time and people tend to forget this. I bet alot of people were like the young hyper kids at that age in some form.

Do I think young anime fans are out of hand? I think not in the least, they are normal for Events in the USA and Europe. Are they making a bad name for older fans, who’s to say? Nevertheless, there are more 18 only events since there are older fans.

What I am trying to say is Anime Fans around the world are similar in Many Ways. It just takes some time to explain it all from a Marketing and personal perspective.

Note: Sorry for the long post

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Last edited by nadesico81 (08 Dec 2008 - 13:27)
08 Dec 2008 - 13:508358
This is an interesting topic for me particularily because I am a teenager myself and I have noticed certain traits in my friends which I often feel anxious about because I know how irritated people get.

When I first went to Expo - October 2007; so I've only been to 3 Expos so far - I didn't cosplay and I didn't know anything about what it'd be like. The first time I went the impression I got was a LOT different to how people on forums etc. behave. I don't like the free hugs thing, still after seeing a bunch of people doing it my friends fashioned a crappy sign and went around hugging people because they (and even I though I didn't join in) were under the impression that it was okay with everyone to go around hugging each other because it was the nature of the people at the Expo. So basically what I'm trying to say is that for the un-educated few the first time they go to Expo they think it's just fine for people to wander around with free hug signs, scream out yaoi etc. and so ignorance breeds ignorance. (I mean the guy on the yaoi stall this year? If it was my first Expo I'd have been given the impression it was okay seeing as at the time it was getting such a positive response).

It's only since I've been on the forums that I've realized how much of a problem people have. Personally I don't mind the younger silly group of cosplayers who do do some very stupid things sometimes. I'm fine with giving someone a hug then moving on if they ask, though maybe this is because I've never been glomped to death etc. They'll learn eventually and if they don't then they'll end up missing out on a lot. It's like when a load of fangirls jump on a fandom because it's suddenly become popular whereas you've been a fan of it for years. Yes, annoying, but what can you do?

I guess what I'm saying is that yes, whilst it is annoying and maybe something should be done (confiscating inappropriate signs etc.) I wouldn't let it stress you out. Kids will be kids and eventually they'll grow up.

Though to defend the generation which I am a part of, not all of us are idiots XD


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Last edited by ShadowxSong (08 Dec 2008 - 13:54)
08 Dec 2008 - 14:548361
Quote PrincessMark:


In four or five years time, they will probably be that creepy stalker you hear about. Or, will get a massive DSLR and take pervy photos.


Argh!THIS. There was a guy at Aya 05 I remember, we were in a Prince Of Tennis group (except myself I was Shinya from DeG,) and this guy kept standing near us, like almost hiding behind this tree and taking photos of our group.
It wasn't pervy or anything like that, but it really irks me when people do that.

Like miiol, I've just been brought up to be polite and respect people's personal space etc.Also, I don't think we're that scary,so just asking for a photo can't be that bad! You'd get a better pose from all of us as well if you asked.

Also on the glomping front, I'm not a huge fan of it, but I'm much more likely to say yes if you simply ask me first. Jumping at someone from out of nowhere is gonna get you nothing but bad vibes, my friend XD


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08 Dec 2008 - 21:158374
Quote Shazz:


Argh!THIS. There was a guy at Aya 05 I remember, we were in a Prince Of Tennis group (except myself I was Shinya from DeG,) and this guy kept standing near us, like almost hiding behind this tree and taking photos of our group.
It wasn't pervy or anything like that, but it really irks me when people do that.

Like miiol, I've just been brought up to be polite and respect people's personal space etc.Also, I don't think we're that scary,so just asking for a photo can't be that bad! You'd get a better pose from all of us as well if you asked.


So true! It always annoys me slightly when people take sneaky photos when you're clearly browsing the merchandise/talking to your friends/attempting to reapply your lipstick/eat lunch etc...It doesn't take much to ask - the worst someone will ever say is no! Most people who cosplay are probably expecting to have photographs taken anyway, so they probably wouldn't get a bad response if they actually asked! It doesn't take half a second, and who knows, you might even strike up a conversation...

My friends and I have had people taking sneaky pictures in the past, and then tried to say that they were 'candid'. I can understand that some photographers are interested in candid shots, but I for one certainly don't feel comfortable with the thought that people are taking pictures of me without me knowing - 1984 anyone?! Also, it doesn't help that I tend to look like I'm competing in a gurning contest in candid shots! XD

But there will always be someone who thinks a photograph of people eating their lunch is JUST what they need in their collection...-rolls eyes-


08 Dec 2008 - 21:348375
Just to point out that although I'm in the 12-20 age range and do go to school and things, I'm not obsessively loud and Expo bores me a bit now XD


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08 Dec 2008 - 21:388376
Quote Odd-One-Out:
Just to point out that although I'm in the 12-20 age range and do go to school and things, I'm not obsessively loud and Expo bores me a bit now XD


exactly the same for me, well i am loud but thts only when im havng a laugh with friends, i mean PAAALEASEE lmao screaming yaoi pshhh lol id rather shout smile like you mean it lmao


08 Dec 2008 - 21:398377
Quote Odd-One-Out:
Just to point out that although I'm in the 12-20 age range and do go to school and things, I'm not obsessively loud and Expo bores me a bit now XD


Well, I'm only 21 but I find myself ranting sometimes like 'KIDS THESE DAYS*wags finger*"

LOL. That is not a good sign...


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08 Dec 2008 - 22:538379
You also have to remember that conventions and so forth may well have less long-term effects on a person's social life. That person may well only see these people once every few months, or even once every year, therefore they may feel more at ease with subconciously "testing" certain social matters. If the others laugh at this since it's funny (because it's silly/dumb), they may be encouraged.

I generally have a very low tolerance to people who act immature, or make geeks/otaku/whatever-you-want-to-call-it look bad. I'm even embarrassed about when I have. I openly tell people they're being creepy/weird/whatever in real life, which my friends can attest to, and I am likely to get slugged for one of these days. I get very annoyed with it. But I do so in the understanding that if I do something dumb, my friends will stand by me and TELL ME that I'm being an ass.

Sometimes it works. I'm still learning how to be an adult here.


08 Dec 2008 - 23:118381
Quote PrincessMark:

In four or five years time, they will probably be that creepy stalker you hear about. Or, will get a massive DSLR and take pervy photos.


hey stalkers have feelings too y'know!!

the only people i have ever had a problem with at expos are the free huggers,
and that is only because i have had 2 costumes broken because of them even after i said no, at my first expo i was aware before hand that they was the whold free hug thing and wasnt too thrilled at the idea of being felt up by a complete stranger so i took a proactive approach and said that i would make stickers for those the were up for it and others for giving out when you got glomped, seemed lik a good idea so the stickers were made and everyone agreed not to glomp those without a target

however in theory it wasnt as easy as it seemed, many of the free huggers were on the day turn up who just seemed to latch onto the idea weather the recipient was willing or otherwise

sadly now i have a no tollerance attitude towards them, an agressive no get the hell away from me is given to everyone who asks now because after having my donald break beyond repair when i gave a polite no thankyou i dont want anymore cons or expos wrecked by people who are too rude to think about how some people have spent months making something and dont want it smached to smitherines


i personaly dont think, age or how much money you earn has anything to do with it, and i dont think being a yaoi fan does either, it all really comes down to manners, if you are being too loud, generaly the people will let you know, but it is up to the individual to decide how he or she behaves from there,
i guess at conventions rather than expos its less common because there are ACTUALLY THINGS TO DO RATHER THAN WANDER ROUND AIMLESSLY WAITING FOR THE MASQUERADE!!!


08 Dec 2008 - 23:408388
Quote HelloKitty:
i guess at conventions rather than expos its less common because there are ACTUALLY THINGS TO DO RATHER THAN WANDER ROUND AIMLESSLY WAITING FOR THE MASQUERADE!!!


This. GOD DAMMIT THIS >_<

I honestly never even considered that, but it's true. For cosplayers, you walk into expo, sign up for the masquerade, disappear, come back at 1ish for pre-judging, disappear, come back for the masquerade, go home.

I think a lot of people need more experience of real conventions TBH. Until I went to Amecon I had NO IDEA and now I'm thinking of missing out expos alltogether after May.


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CosplayIsland Staff Member


09 Dec 2008 - 00:588392
I concur with the "Waiting around with nothing to do" bit.

I actually ENJOYED Expo in October, wearing a very obscure costume meant that *nobody* glomped me or bothered me, the only people who asked for my photo were fans of the show and that was just *bloody nice*.

I think Expo can be alright, depending on the company and what you are wearing.

It's nice to do a big costume for the masquerade to win a prize, but honestly I don't think I can be bothered with the hassle.

I'd still take Minami and Ame/Aya over an Expo anyday, but I think I have found my own way to enjoy them.

~M


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Voice Over/Actor - Presenter/Host - Geek/Gamer
www.markhulmes.co.uk
09 Dec 2008 - 01:058394
Quote PrincessMark:
I'd still take Minami and Ame/Aya over an Expo anyday, but I think I have found my own way to enjoy them.


By giving me your shit to lug around?

...git. ^_^


09 Dec 2008 - 01:398396
Quote Oz:
Quote PrincessMark:
I'd still take Minami and Ame/Aya over an Expo anyday, but I think I have found my own way to enjoy them.


By giving me your shit to lug around?

...git. ^_^


Well you have to be useful for something don't you?

HURRRR! ^________^


__________________
Voice Over/Actor - Presenter/Host - Geek/Gamer
www.markhulmes.co.uk
09 Dec 2008 - 02:118397
@HelloKitty: TOTALLY agree on the free huggers thing. I've never really liked them anyway (who does?), but I decided I outright hated them when some idiot thought it'd be a fantastic idea to rugby-tackle my sister and refuse to let go. Bear in mind my sister was wearing her dream cosplay for the first time ever and we'd worked on it for nearly a year, so we were not in the least bit impressed.

What made it even worse that he eventually grudgingly let go when we both told him to "get the f*** off", and then glared at us as if we'd done something terrible to him!


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