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27 Sep 2011 - 22:4770992
Painting Fibreglass
I've worked out that fibreglass is the best thing for my prop, and I've got the model done - it looks really nice. Does anyone have any experience with working with this stuff? If so, what would be the best stuff to use to paint it? I was thinking of using regular spray-paint, but I'm not entirely sure how well it'd work.


28 Sep 2011 - 15:4471049
use car spray paint sand and clean the area then use a primer before your top coat and you shouldnt have any problems

just remember to use light coats, do not cake it on. The paint will run and you will have to sand a lot of paint off to get the uniform surface back

Start and stop in open air. This helps to keep the paint surface uniform on all points the spray hits.


29 Sep 2011 - 12:2571128
I usually work to this system when I'm looking for "super fine" finishing on hard surfaces...

1)sand with medium grit to break the surface
2)spray with primer (you should still see sanding streaks, don't worry!)
3)sand again, this time with finer paper. The aim isn't to remove all the primer, just the very surface.
4)sand again with wet and dry
5)prime again
6)wet and dry, then keep doing step 5&6 till you have the surface quality you're looking for.

Finally, spray with enamel, OR, if you want a metal finish, use rub and buff.

One fairly important tip is to not "cheap out" on sprays. Get good quality branded stuff. Own brands like Wilko's are terrible and are far too brittle.

The reason you sand is to give the surface of the object you're painting a keyed quality, which should prevent chipping.


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29 Sep 2011 - 17:5871162
Just as an added note to Xaes comment

When you sand it you should ring the areas that have lumps and holes and fill those with a filler of some description.
You can use car body filler like a V11, but its a pain to work with.

When we sand and paint fibreglass models at work we use this stuff to fill any holes and even out any dips
http://www.refinishsystems.com/product/225-184/BondaBodyLightFillerNo7

Then just keep sanding it back. Then spray it with a 2 pack primer, get a few thin coats on there, then sand with a fabric pad, you'll see an orange peel like texture appear, keep going until that disappears. Then check for anymore holes or uneven surfaces and repeat each step.

Then finish with a 2 pack primer again as your base and go from there.


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01 Oct 2011 - 08:4271282
Quote xaerael:
I usually work to this system when I'm looking for "super fine" finishing on hard surfaces...

1)sand with medium grit to break the surface
2)spray with primer (you should still see sanding streaks, don't worry!)
3)sand again, this time with finer paper. The aim isn't to remove all the primer, just the very surface.
4)sand again with wet and dry
5)prime again
6)wet and dry, then keep doing step 5&6 till you have the surface quality you're looking for.

Finally, spray with enamel, OR, if you want a metal finish, use rub and buff.

One fairly important tip is to not "cheap out" on sprays. Get good quality branded stuff. Own brands like Wilko's are terrible and are far too brittle.

The reason you sand is to give the surface of the object you're painting a keyed quality, which should prevent chipping.



I watched this method being applied to a life rending of a Pikachu at UCA in Rochester and it works like a charm

Xae is definitely right about the paints. There are some thing your ok to scrimp on to a certain degree (Wilko do some fairly well known brands on Fibre Glass and Resin) but paints are too important for that.

I usually go for Hanmerite or Cegen (I think that's what it called) Metal and Car Paints nowadays since the Plastik stuff didn't stay on as well as I'd hopes on some things like pauldrons (but they were the only ones with the Tint that I wanted )

But Halfords do brilliant stuff. They retail the same rate as some of the known brands and work stupidly well.

It might be prudent to invest in Car Lacquer and buff accordingly to get a brilliant metallic shine.


01 Oct 2011 - 12:5871290
Just posting in here to find he thread later. Need to use a lot of fibreglass in the next cosplay, and i need a super-smooth laquered finish


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