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25 Jul 2011 - 22:4864308
Painting!!
I have general painting tips for everything that has to do with cosplay.

1. Bodypaint.
Is bodypaint okay to wear for cons?
Doesnt it run when you sweat, and is bodypaint the only thing you can use?

2. Painting Plastic.
Is spraypaint good for painting plastic? Or can I use something else? Such as beads, or plastic sunglasses.

3. Painting foam.
Is craft paint the only thing I can use for craft foam?
Or is thier anything better?
Can I make craft foam look shiny with any sort of paint?

4. Fabric paint.
Is thier any tips I need to know about using fabric paint? Like desighns such as flowers and so forth.

5. Detail
What can I use to add detail to things? Such as armor, or realistic desighns like skulls or anything else.
Are sponges good?

If thiers any painting knowledge that someone has, please let me know.
(so many questions, sorry) ^^'


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26 Jul 2011 - 00:1464310
I'll answer what I can:

Quote CharmingTenshi:
2. Painting Plastic.
Is spraypaint good for painting plastic? Or can I use something else? Such as beads, or plastic sunglasses.

Spray paint will work fine on plastic, you may want to go over it with a fine grit sandpaper first to rough it up a bit so the spray paint will stick but generally it should be fine.

Quote CharmingTenshi:

3. Painting foam.
Is craft paint the only thing I can use for craft foam?
Or is thier anything better?
Can I make craft foam look shiny with any sort of paint?

no, yes, yes. You can use spray paint on craft foam but on other types of foam (e.g. polysterene) it doesn't work. You would want to try spraying a sample of the foam etc before you go onto your main piece just in case it melts it but foams such as craft foam and plastazote is fine for spray paint. In terms of making it look shiny it depends on how shiny you want it. If you just want it to sparkle a little bit get metallic coloured spray paint, this has tiny flecks in it (almost like glitter or how some metallicy coloured cars are). If you want it to shine like a honed edge on a blade you can get chrome spray paint. Really before applying any paint to foam you'll want to seal it first. This can be done with either latex (which can be mixed with acrylic paint before you paint it on) or using a watered down PVA which you just paint it on with a brush before painting. This will give you a nice surface and will assist with when you spray your chrome spray on as it stops the foam from absorbing all the spray paint and also gives you a nice even surface.

Alternatively to spray paint you can use acrylic paint which is much the same as spray paint just applied with a brush. This is the stuff I use for sword edges.

Quote CharmingTenshi:

5. Detail
What can I use to add detail to things? Such as armor, or realistic desighns like skulls or anything else.
Are sponges good?

I assume you're still speaking about painting here, pretty much the same as above. It really depends on the detailing you need to do. If it's raised detailing like a swirl on some armour, some people use hot glue to create the raised pattern and then you just paint it with a paint brush. Sponges etc can also be used but it really depends on what the detail is. If it's raised clear gems and stuff you may want to investigate resin which is a clear stuff that you pour into a mold and it sets clear. You can add colouring etc to this when its still in it's liquid stage to prevent the need to paint etc.

Hope some of that at least helps a little.


26 Jul 2011 - 08:0864319
For fabric painting, from my experience, if you can get hold of fabric pens in the colours you want then they are much easier to use when you are starting out.

It's basically like colouring in and then you iron the fabric to set the colour. They're probably only good for very simple designs though


26 Jul 2011 - 08:1264320
If you want a shiny suface to painted foam, so like a metalic coloured armour or similar you can varnish the finished piece with Isoflex - a hard wearing, clear roof sealant.


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26 Jul 2011 - 08:3164321
I'm no expert on foams, but I am good with solids such as wood/plastic/metal

Any non-porous surface can get a wide range of finishes.

Plastics, metals, and generally smooth surfaces just need a layer of primer, finished with finishing paper or a fine grade wet'n'dry paper (around the 400-2000 mark) and two-three coats of spray paint.

I've made a mask look like porcelain, and it's main component was polyfilla. (my pic <<< )

Most car body shops, even halfords can assist. The trick is in how well you use the combination of primer and sandpaper. If you're good you can get the surface to come up as smooth as glass. With the right paint you can make this look like chrome steel, or kevlar plating.

Once you've spray painted and want to paint more, you have a choice of masking out areas to spray again, or using little pots of enamel paint. These are best for shiny and toughness as they're meant for metals or to make things look like metal.

I would just say that don't cheap out on primer or spray paint. Automotive paint will be a LOT better for whatever you want and there's such a wide range. I use something called filler primer which is very thick primer, it's handy for filling in little imperfections.

And remember that lots of thin coats are better than one thick coat of paint.

If you need any more help on stuff like this, gimme a shout :3



Last edited by JaeXD (26 Jul 2011 - 08:32)
26 Jul 2011 - 18:2464359
whoa o.o

thanks alot guys! Its all helps. ^^
I need some answers on body paint though '
but more suggestions about my other questions is still good.


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26 Jul 2011 - 18:4664361
I haven't used body paint myself yet but I've been doing some research on it for a costume.

Stuff like Snazzaroo is okay but it does rub off quite easily, especially if you sweat a lot (which is always a case with cons). So you need something to fix/seal it (such as Ben Nye's Liquiset).
Alternatively, you could use PAX, although this has the opposite problem and is quite durable but is tough to wash off.


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26 Jul 2011 - 22:4164398
Actually, I need to follow this closely too.

I'll be needing white face paint that can withstand perspiration (What!? I'm a male, we.. sweat ~_~)

Is there a middle ground face/body paint? And if not, then would a good scrub in the shower get rid of the PAX stuff?


26 Jul 2011 - 23:0764399
this persons live journal entry might be useful for people considering PAX. It sounds like pretty good stuff but also a PITA to get off once it's on.


27 Jul 2011 - 09:4864414
General body paint comes in two kinds: water based (ie Snazaroo) and oil based (ie Grimas). Water-based will come off with sweat, sweat being water XD and I've also found it tends not to give as smooth a coverage. However it's by far the easiest to remove, a good shower will take it off quite happily.

Oil-based body paints go on really smoothly and give great coverage without cracking. They won't come off with sweat although they will rub off onto things - my boyfriend's suitcase still bears the mark of my Mystique costume... They're still quite cheap but harder to remove, you need either a LOT of shower gel or a specialist remover.

Pax paint pretty much won't go anywhere and you NEED a specialist remover. You can touch things and it won't mark them. However it's been my experience that it can remain a little tacky for quite a while and if it touches another painted area whilst not completely 100% dry the two areas can stick together. Pax is made by mixing a theatrical skin adhesive with paint after all, so bear this in mind.

That's my experience with body paints.


27 Jul 2011 - 13:1364421
Quote Odangochan:
General body paint comes in two kinds: water based (ie Snazaroo) and oil based (ie Grimas). Water-based will come off with sweat, sweat being water XD and I've also found it tends not to give as smooth a coverage. However it's by far the easiest to remove, a good shower will take it off quite happily.

Oil-based body paints go on really smoothly and give great coverage without cracking. They won't come off with sweat although they will rub off onto things - my boyfriend's suitcase still bears the mark of my Mystique costume... They're still quite cheap but harder to remove, you need either a LOT of shower gel or a specialist remover.

Pax paint pretty much won't go anywhere and you NEED a specialist remover. You can touch things and it won't mark them. However it's been my experience that it can remain a little tacky for quite a while and if it touches another painted area whilst not completely 100% dry the two areas can stick together. Pax is made by mixing a theatrical skin adhesive with paint after all, so bear this in mind.

That's my experience with body paints.


thats some good information! o.o
I'll keep that in mind ^^


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28 Jul 2011 - 10:3064543
Quote Quinzel:
Stuff like Snazzaroo is okay but it does rub off quite easily, especially if you sweat a lot (which is always a case with cons). So you need something to fix/seal it (such as Ben Nye's Liquiset).


I've heard of the Ben nye stuff, and I think this might be a bit more suited to one of the applications I had in mind.

Have you used this liquiset? If you have how was it?


31 Jul 2011 - 01:3164802
Quote JaeXD:
I've heard of the Ben nye stuff, and I think this might be a bit more suited to one of the applications I had in mind.

Have you used this liquiset? If you have how was it?


Sorry, only just saw this reply X_X.

I haven't used the liquiset stuff myself yet. It's on my list of things to try, but from what I've heard through random Googling it does help make it a little more lasting. I actually got the name from SachikoYumi's journals for her Scanty cosplay so it could be worth asking her.


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