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14 Mar 2014 - 15:54112022
How to create ridges at fabric seams
I'm doing research for a cosplay project at the moment and I've run into a bit of a wall.
Here's 2 reference photos:

http://www.dealspwn.com/writer/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/castlevania-lords-of-shadow-2-interior.jpg

http://wallpaperpassion.com/upload1/40059/castlevania-lords-of-shadow-2-image.jpg

It's a faux leather coat made up of 7 segments, the back piece and 3 pieces under each arm arranged in a triangular fashion.
There appears to be some kind of a raised bump or ridge line at each seam and I can't figure out how to create this effect. I'm not sure if it even has a name. Sewing tutorials and blogs haven't revealed anything about how to make it, or if it's something completely separate that's added afterwards.


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14 Mar 2014 - 16:02112025
Quote KakarotVersion5:
I'm doing research for a cosplay project at the moment and I've run into a bit of a wall.
Here's 2 reference photos:

http://www.dealspwn.com/writer/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2013/09/castlevania-lords-of-shadow-2-interior.jpg

http://wallpaperpassion.com/upload1/40059/castlevania-lords-of-shadow-2-image.jpg

It's a faux leather coat made up of 7 segments, the back piece and 3 pieces under each arm arranged in a triangular fashion.
There appears to be some kind of a raised bump or ridge line at each seam and I can't figure out how to create this effect. I'm not sure if it even has a name. Sewing tutorials and blogs haven't revealed anything about how to make it, or if it's something completely separate that's added afterwards.


i wish i could help you on this one, it would be useful for me at the moment! good luck and i'll be keeping a keen eye on this thread x


14 Mar 2014 - 16:14112027
Might piping produce the effect you're looking for?

http://sewnowwhat.files.wordpress.com/2008/05/collar.jpg

You can either buy it pre-made or make your own to the exact width you want, and then just sew it into the seams as you're constructing the garment


14 Mar 2014 - 23:27112037
yeah piping would be best
you can get different types too


15 Mar 2014 - 11:08112040
Thanks, I've managed to track down some piping that would do the trick.
So, that's the what taken care of, now for the how.
Are there any tutorials or instructional videos on how to sew it into the seam lines?


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15 Mar 2014 - 12:01112041
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YcAqdzsqESs

That one looks good, but you literally just line it up and sew it at the same time you sew the seam together


16 Mar 2014 - 13:18112064
So I'd be looking at sewing 4 pieces of faux leather simultaneously.
Would I need any particular footing/needles to do it? Somehow I don't think a standard set-up would cut it with my machine.


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16 Mar 2014 - 15:02112066
This might come too little too late, but a possible 2 alternatives to recreate the effect-

1- give yourself some extra seam allowance, and sew your seam. Now note which side of the seam you want the raised ridge and trim the seam allowance on that side of the seam to the width that you want the ridge.
Then fold both sides of the seam allowance to the side you want your ridge to appear and top stitch along the edge of the hidden raw edge of the trimmed seam allowance.
What you've effectively done here is to sandwich the trimmed seam allowance and use it as a sort of 'quilting' for your raised ridge therefore you could theoretically sandwich an extra strip of fabric in there for a more raised effect.

I'd try this first on some scrap to see if the effect is dramatic enouch for your needs. The advantage being that you only ever sew through a maximum 2 layers of faux leather/leatherette, sparing your machine any difficulty.
You can also make it look deeper by rubbing in darker leather polish or dry brushing acrylics along the seams.

2- This one is way more involved but gives a better effect in the end. Basically, the technique is to make bias binding from your faux leather and using this to make a ridge.
So cut up your pieces for the jacket and then cut out some strips from extra leather that will be 3xwider than your ridge and mark a line along it that is 3rd the width of the strip, then grab the piece of jacket that you want the raised edge to be on and pin the strip face down onto the front side of your jacket piece matching the raw edge of the strip to the where the seam will be on the jacket piece (your marked line should be nearer the seam side), then sew this down along the marked line.
You can then fold this over and press it flat and then sew up your jacket as normal, making sure that the strip is sandwiched in the seam so when you open out the seam and press in flat, the bias is sewed into the seam.

The advantage to this technique is that since there is no topstitching, then there is no visible stitching on the front of your jacket.

If you want then you can hand stitch the seam allowance under the biased side of the seam, so long as you don't break through the bias binding layer, the stitching will be invisible (or technically under the bias layer).

this will challenge your sewing machine with a maximum of three layers of faux leather.

The written description above makes the techniques sound far more complicated than they actually are, so if you're confused, just ask me to clarify.
And aplologies if I've got the wrong idea on what you asked for in the first place.



Last edited by Ninodog (16 Mar 2014 - 15:21)
19 Mar 2014 - 11:11112131
It does make sense, but I had to re-read it a few times to make sure I got the gist.
What kind of a set-up would I need on my machine to be able to handle those layers?


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19 Mar 2014 - 22:02112140
that's going to depend on the weight of the faux leather and the sewing machine you're using. Try using a small scrap of your leather and layer it into 3 or 4 and try handcranking the needle down and see if it will push through with not too much effort. Otherwise you may need to go for your sharp heavier needles, which may have come with your machine.
I don't think your foot will need to change unless you're topstitching and the surface of the faux leather sticks and catches on the foot, then you may want to think about getting a teflon foot, or laying some tracing paper over the leather and stitch over that and then tear off the paper.

that's all I can give you without knowing the nature of this leather.


20 Mar 2014 - 11:22112149
This is what I'll or ordering, unless I can find anything more accurate:
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/FAUX-HIGH-QUALITY-LEATHER-MATERIAL-LEATHERETTE-PVC-VINYL-UPHOLSTERY-FABRIC-/140879545107?pt=UK_Crafts_Fabric&var=&hash=item20cd134313


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22 Mar 2014 - 00:32112178
Alarm bells rang out the moment I noticed the word 'upholstery' in the link.
I have some of that type of faux leather and it will go through my machine without any special mods, but for top-stitching check if it is sticking on the foot, if so then try out the tips.

I've run four layers and seems to be fine with it. It's not as thick as you'd expect even when layered up, but it is quite stiff and might not move the way you want a cloak/coat to move.


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