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08 Jun 2013 - 19:02103826
I'm sorry, but she was very clear to what she was doing with the money and whatnot. She also only started with requesting 650, other people decided to donate that much.

It's up to them to choose to contribute, no-one else. She didn't lie to them, she was frank, but she's not deceived anyone.

What I find funny is that people seem to think cosplay is this thing that has no space in making something sexy for the sake of it; FYI, in Japan it's pretty much any costume whatsoever, including those you'd just have in the bedroom.

Isn't the another thread on here (started by you, btw Iceclimber) saying people should stop judging other people? Especially for the costume they choose to do? How about we keep to that opinion and not go about judging this girl for doing what she wants that has no effect on anyone here, whatsoever.

End rant.


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08 Jun 2013 - 19:34103827
Something about this whole thing really doesn't sit right with me. I don't like the idea of crowdsourcing a costume. It's made worse for me being a 'sexy' costume. After seeing this woman's other costumes and the photos of them, I feel like she's not doing it for the reasons the rest of us do.

I feel like stuff like only encourages the harassment problem for legitimate cosplayers. Also it could set a bad precedent.


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09 Jun 2013 - 12:03103845
I think what makes people uncomfortable isn't the fact that they think she's deceiving people or the fact that it's a sexy costume (and many of us have argued in the past in favour of people's right to wear revealing costumes). It's the fact she's asking money for a costume that people find disquieting, in particularly because she's offering presumably suggestive shots as perks. I don't find booth babes that appealing for the same reason because rather than wearing those skimpy costumes out of love for the character, they do it purely to make money.


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09 Jun 2013 - 13:51103851
Quote Carmina:
I think what makes people uncomfortable isn't the fact that they think she's deceiving people or the fact that it's a sexy costume (and many of us have argued in the past in favour of people's right to wear revealing costumes). It's the fact she's asking money for a costume that people find disquieting, in particularly because she's offering presumably suggestive shots as perks. I don't find booth babes that appealing for the same reason because rather than wearing those skimpy costumes out of love for the character, they do it purely to make money.


you've pretty much hit the nail on the head with this


18 Jun 2013 - 15:28104202
Well, I suppose the main problem here is the meaning of cosplay.

We're doing it to get into the skin of our most loved characters and to dive into the fantasy of their worlds.
We're not doing it to get paid, and we're certainly not doing it for sexual attention.

- Sure, she can cosplay all she wants and make money how she wants but, of course, that's not to say people won't like it.

- The annoyance is people using cosplay specifically to look sexy, thus destroying many childhoods(T▽T).
- If a character is 'skimpy' or 'sexy' then the cosplayer has all right to be that way too, it's just disheartening to see people purposely selling themselves to earn ways into cosplay, and the likelihood of using cosplay as a way to gain money through provocativeness.


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"Are you looking at me?...Who are you looking at?!" - Dr.N.Gin
18 Jun 2013 - 18:15104215
I think if she's developed a fan group that's willing to collectively give her $4000 to create a costume and photoshoot then well done to her. Sure, some people may have prefered it if the costume was going to be accurate and not so revealing, but thats her decision. I think the bigger issue is if it's ok to make profit on a costume based on a character that isn't your intellectual property. I know cosplayers like Yaya Han that make profit on posters and art cards of their costumes, and cosplayers that wouldn't dream of putting up posters for sale of their costumes due to copyright reasons.

I wouldn't start a kickstarter to fund my costumes, but she's done well from it, so props to her.


19 Jun 2013 - 10:05104239
I've been struggling to come up with a reply that expresses my feeling, but doesn't insult anyone, since we got told off

The way I see it, is that cosplay is a hobby. We do it for ourselves and our friends. Once you start cosplaying for other people it stops being a hobby and becomes something else.

To me at least, once you start taking money from people for it (by having people fund your costumes, or by selling photos of yourself in costume, or by charging for appearences for example), you stop being a cosplayer, and become a model.


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19 Jun 2013 - 11:18104243
I personally think that cosplay is already linked more closely to modelling than we sometimes think. The key is to model the costume while in character. When you're at a con and you're in a costume, people often ask for photos. Unless they ask to be in the picture with you (which often ends in hover arms and such) what do you do? I assume you pose.
Lets take for example my silent hill nurse costume, as I think its borderline enough to use as a good example. its a slightly revealing costume, but thats what the nurses were meant to be. Yes the dress is short, but its dirty and their faces are all warped and they're pretty gross. When I get stopped for a photo, I could either put my hand o my hip and point my leg to the side and try look sexy, or I could twitch my body and find an awkward position that'll look appropriate for the photo. I'm modelling the costume, but im doing it in character. Cosplay doesn't mean you need to look beautiful or skinny; the main reason I picked sh nurse at last mcm was because I had a horrible bright red rash on my arm and it didn't look too out of place in the nurse costume.
Even if you enter a masquerade, you're basically modelling your costume on a catwalk. Its your creation and you're showing it off. Models are the mannequins for their clothes, make up, hair pieces etc, and we are too.
I think everyones main issue with this woman is she's taking a character, changing the costume to flaunt her assets, and then posing seductively. Sex sells and she knows it. Its not the way we'd do it, but its working for her and its clearly what her fanbase wants.
I dont have an issue with her being paid, some cosplayers make money by holding workshops and being guests of honour or judges for contests at cons. If a con emailed you tomorrow saying they love your work and want to pay you to do a costume q&a session would you really say no? I wouldn't.


19 Jun 2013 - 12:29104247
I think you raise an interesting point that earning money from modelling cosplay is profiting from someone else's intellectual property. Most people cosplay essentially as a hobby, to have fun, rather than to make money. The distinction between posing in cosplay because you want to share the appreciation for a character and posing in order to make money should be obvious.

Sex sells, for sure, but just because thats a true state of affairs doesn't mean its a good one. And no, I don't think being paid to hold a workshop is precisely the same thing, as you're sharing a skillset (although I hasten to add many of us have run panels at conventions without expecting financial recompense).


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19 Jun 2013 - 17:53104258
I wouldn't try sell posters of myself in skimpy costumes, but she does and its clearly working for her. Im not gunna tell her she can't sex up princess peach if that's what she wants to do. And with the workshop suggestion I know it's not entirely the same, but some people find ways to earn a little money back with various bits and bobs. I once considered trying to get hold of some cosplayers and make a calendar to raise money for the Special Effect charity, but wasn't sure if it would be allowed because of the potential copyright issues.

I think it's interesting that one kickstarter campaign can raise so many moral and legal questions, but im glad its being discussed. I think the quicker the cosplay community figures out where it stands with the concepts of making profit from cosplay then we can help others make educated decisions regarding cosplay. Cosplay is an expensive hobby and while I think that some small form of commercialisation will increase the quality of the work we see (such as the makers of bioshock infinite and lollipop chainsaw hiring cosplayers for their ad campaigns), I dont think a woman in a sexy peach cosplay is the answer.


19 Jun 2013 - 20:01104265
I'm gonna point out that in Japan, where cosplay arguably comes from (at least on this kinda scale), costumes for the bedroom are also called cosplay.

And if you see the photos from them, you'll be hardpressed not to find one with extreme panty shots and cleavage shots. They don't get touched, but hell, they are extremely sexualised.

But it also feels like, this whole thing, that people have already decided she's not doing it for the love of it but for the attention and money. I think that's pretty out of order of people, and is just the same as someone deciding that that girl dressed as Power Girl is doing it for attention and thus should be given that, however inappropriate that attention is.

Also, people seem readily to blame this kinda person for unwanted attention at conventions, conveniently forgetting that you're not allowed to touch booth babes, they are purely eye candy. Cat calls are also kept quite low. It's easy to point the finger at "this type of person ruins it" when, actually, it's got nothing to do with them - people should be able to work out what is appropriate level of attention to give someone else.

EDIT: Also, this has just occurred to me with regard to legality etc - but, in that case, what's the difference between that and being a commissioner? You're making money from someone else's propriety, at the end of the day. Although, I believe (with media) when it's been published it's now publicly owned. As long as you don't try to pass/sell it as your own work/design, there isn't actually any laws to protect them. I believe, don't hold me to that, I know it's the case with written work.


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Last edited by NixieThePixie (19 Jun 2013 - 20:12)
19 Jun 2013 - 22:17104269
Quote NixieThePixie:

But it also feels like, this whole thing, that people have already decided she's not doing it for the love of it but for the attention and money. I think that's pretty out of order of people, and is just the same as someone deciding that that girl dressed as Power Girl is doing it for attention and thus should be given that, however inappropriate that attention is.


It's true that we can't say for sure why she's doing it. However I don't think comparing it to a power girl cosplayer is right- whilst Princess Peach's original costume isn't originally revealing, power girl's is. Furthermore this girl is actually offering sexy images in exchange for money, whilst one can not assume any random cosplayer in a revealing outfit is willing to do the same.

I should also add that I don't think anyone has even remotely suggested that its okay to give someone unwanted attention beyond what they have consented to.


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Last edited by Carmina (20 Jun 2013 - 10:19)
20 Jun 2013 - 08:07104273
Quote NixieThePixie:
But it also feels like, this whole thing, that people have already decided she's not doing it for the love of it but for the attention and money.


I didn;t notice at first, but Katz links to her modelling profile: "PLEASE CONTACT ME ABOUT MY RATES: I am currently booking PAID assignments for the fall time and my rates are very reasonable."

So it seems she's already a paid model. I think it's fair to assume this for the money too. Or rather the publicity. The original project attracted less than 50 backers, but I wonder how many people have been reached by the outrage/perv wave?


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