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11 May 2013 - 17:58102380
Getting Dirty
This has probably been asked a tonne, but how do you guys add dirt and sweat to a costume? I have a Walking Dead Grimes deputy shirt and undershirt I want to get grimy. I don't want to go too overboard with blood spray and soaked in mud, but I'd like to with a really subtle worn in dusting of dirt and dried sweat that preferably won't wash out and not leave me smelling like a turd. Some pictures now, because pictures always help.







Big pic of undershirt



Last edited by Mr Sue Denim (11 May 2013 - 17:59)
11 May 2013 - 18:09102381
Tea staining works well. And use sand paper to make the fabric look worn. Remember to focus on the areas which would naturally see the most wear and tear.


12 May 2013 - 20:14102438
Is there a certain knack or method to tea staining or do you just splodge it on the fabric in the teabag? Also, is it wash friendly? I imagine smelling of tea all day will start feeling a bit repulsive after a while.


23 May 2013 - 17:33102983
Hi there. I work in theatrical costuming & we do this on a regular basis. There are various methods...

- Tea staining is great for an all over off-white stain & if you bunch your fabric up it'll be blotchy. Start weak/less tea bags & build up with time. If you rinse it out well you won't smell like a WI meeting all day!

- Potassium Permanganate is another method we use. Practice it first as any affect you get is pretty fast (as in colour fast, not quick). You can get it from chemists behind the counter. It comes in crystal form & you either disolve them in water or apply directly to the garment & wet it. You need to practice as the crystals are purple & the water will be purple, it's the oxidising process with the air that turns it brown & shitty.

- Dylon fabric dyes are another good method. Make them up with salt & water as dark or pale as you want & sponge on where you want shade/effect. A good way to build up colour & you can use red to give a blood stain effect as well as brown for ageing.

- Spray paint can give good results if you spray from enough distance & I've also used the stone effect sprays for dirtying down.

- Lastly, you can now buy a product called Dirty Down http://www.dirtydown.co.uk They're not all as great as they look on the website. They don't ALL work on ALL fabrics & they're not permanent, they rub off. The sticks are thicker in colour & last longer than the sprays but they're still not as good as they make out.

Hope this all helps you.
Hydraxia


23 May 2013 - 18:35102985
Teabags create amazing sweat stains!

Also, coffee in a water spritzer bottle for muddy water stains - add a couple of drops of yellow or green food colouring to make it look older and algae-infested.

For caked mud and dirt, what we use is coffee and flour - mix it up, and apply - you look like you've been traipsing through mud!
It also doubles as easy mud for your skin, and washes right off!

Blood stains - what I found works really well, is first dip your fingers into fake blood and flick on your clothes. When it dries, it will look brown and less blood like.
On top of the brown stains dab a little bright red acrylic paint. It makes the blood look fresh, and the brown stains look as though it's soaked and pooled into the fabric, giving it an all-over realistic look.

Quote Mr Sue Denim:
Is there a certain knack or method to tea staining or do you just splodge it on the fabric in the teabag? Also, is it wash friendly? I imagine smelling of tea all day will start feeling a bit repulsive after a while.


Tea stain the collar, and armpits - also really REALLY dirty up the seams of your clothes. Dirt gathers and collects there and will look more believable.
Just run your teabag up and down the seams and dab at the areas you want to appear sweaty.

It actually doesn't smell at all unless your use some really fruity teabags. Once you've stained the clothes, let it air out in a room with an open window for a few hours, any smell will be virtually non existent by that point unless you really press your nose to the fabric



Last edited by Candystriped (23 May 2013 - 18:39)
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